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Bill Gates says India is winning its war on Human Waste

Microsoft’s co-founder said the leader say his words with action by implementing the Swachh Bharat campaign mention that India is winning its war on Human Waste.

Bill Gates Talk about Swachh Bharat campaign

Microsoft’s Bill Gates praise Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Swachh Bharat campaign in his latest Titled. “India is winning its war on human waste”. Gates said Modi perform his words with action, by launching the nationwide campaign that aims at ending open defecation by 2019.

Quoting statistics, Gates highlight the challenges and the progress that the large-scale campaign has made. “In 2014, when Clean India [Swachh Bharat] began, just 42% of Indians access to proper sanitation. Today 63% do,” Gates wrote. While adding that he can not think of another time when a leader had broached “such a sensitive topic so frankly and so publicly.”

He update the Bharatiya Janata Party-led administration’s “ingenious ways” of addressing the problem. “The government work with Google so users in 11 cities could search online for the nearest public toilets. Though to get directions and read reviews by other users. On streets throughout the country, billboards remind passers by of the mission. Stars from Bollywood films and cricket teams speak out on TV and radio. Even India’s currency features the Swachh Bharat logo.”

Prime Minister Efforts on Improving Sanitation Conditions

If you’re wondering why the Prime Minister would put a spotlight on a subject. That most of us would rather not even think about. Therefore Take a look at the statistics. Of the 1.7 million people worldwide who die from unsafe water, sanitation. And hygiene each year, more than 600,000 are in India. A quarter of young girls there drop out of school because there’s no decent toilet available. When you factor in the deaths, sickness, and lost opportunity, poor sanitation costs India more than $106 billion a year.

In other words, solving this problem will save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. Help girls stay in school. And boost the country’s economy. Improving sanitation is a big focus for our foundation. And we are working closely with the Indian government in support of its goals.

There are two keys to achieving the targets of Clean India. One involves giving everyone access to a well-manage toilet. Which means all the waste is consider (either on-site or in a treatment facility) to remove the pathogens that make people sick. It’s crucial to get the entire process right, from containing the waste in a toilet to collecting it. Transporting it if necessary  and treating it. If one link in the chain fails, people still get sick.

Unfortunately, in many places, it’s not feasible to lay down sewer pipes or build treatment facilities. That’s why Indian researchers are testing a variety of new tools, including redesigned toilets that don’t require sewer systems and advanced ways to treat human waste.

Clean India Activities

So far, the progress is impressive. In 2014, when Clean India began, just 42 percent of Indians had access to proper sanitation. Today 63 percent do. And the government has a detailed plan to finish the job by October 2, 2019, the 150th anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi’s birth. Officials know which states are on track and which are lagging behind, thanks to a robust reporting system that includes photographing and geo tagging each newly installed toilet.

But giving people access to toilets isn’t enough. You also have to persuade them to use the toilets. That’s the second key to Clean India, and in some ways it is even harder than the first. People can be reluctant to change old habits.

Clean India has ingenious ways of tackling that problem. In some communities, groups of children band together to call out people who are defecating in the open and encourage them to use public toilets instead. In a pilot project that will be expanded next year, the government worked with Google so users in 11 cities could search online for the nearest public toilets, get directions. And read reviews by other users. On streets throughout the country, billboards remind passers-by of the mission. Stars from Bollywood films and cricket teams speak out on TV and radio. Even India’s currency features the Swachh Bharat logo.

The hard work is paying off. Today more than 30 percent of Indian villages declare free of open defecation, up from 8 percent in 2015.

Steps towards Swachh Bharat

What I love most about Clean India is that it identify a big problem. Got everyone working on it, and is using measurement to show where things need to be done differently. As the old saying goes, What gets measured gets done. If you don’t set ambitious targets and chart your progress, you end up settling for business as usual—and in this case, business as usual would mean poor sanitation keeps killing more than half a million Indians every year.

By aiming high, the people of India are demanding change, and they are taking action to make it happen. It is a great example for other countries and an inspiration for all of us who believe everyone deserves a chance at a healthy, productive life.

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